Announcing Game Two of PP4: “Survive the Internet”

Announcing Game Two of PP4: “Survive the Internet”

Yes, that’s one of the four brand new games that will be in The Jackbox Party Pack 4! (Oh, yeah, in case you missed it, we announced that in addition to Fibbage 3 there will be four brand new titles in Party Pack 4.)

All right, I’ll take the bait: What is Survive the Internet? It’s a user-generated comedy game where you twist your friends’ opinions in a myriad of hilarious ways! As the name suggests, all of this action takes place in our version of the internet.

But isn’t the internet just a fad? Will people understand this cyber world you’ve created? After spending hundreds of thousands of dollars in research, we’ve discovered that most people are familiar with the internet, so we don’t expect there to be much of a learning curve.

How does it work? During each round of play, everybody gets a different prompt that asks a simple, opinion-based question like, “How do you feel about Fidget Cubes?” If Fidget Cube enthusiast and meeting-disruptor Arnie Niekamp were to get this prompt, he’d probably respond with, “I’m addicted to them!”

That response is then randomly sent to another player—let’s say… me. My objective is to take his quote out of context in the funniest way imaginable. Suppose we’re on a social media site (one of the many sites in the game). I would need to come up with a hashtag to follow “I’m addicted to them!” Being an extremely clever person, I would enter #Swirlies. So now it looks like Arnie, that putz, made a social media post saying, “I’m addicted to them! #Swirlies”

Everybody then votes on who comes out looking the most ridiculous. People would of course vote for Arnie—meaning I, the twist-writer, would be rewarded with some sweet, sweet points. But Arnie wouldn’t leave that round empty-handed. He would get some pity points for sacrificing his image. The player with the most points at the end of the game “survives.”

As fun as it is to read a long post about how a new game works, it’s even more enjoyable to play/watch it firsthand, so check out our Twitch or YouTube stream this Thursday (6/29 @ 6 PM CT) and watch us debut our new internet game, Survive the Internet… on the internet!

Veterans Day Charity Stream

Veterans Day Charity Stream

This Friday, November 11 is Veterans Day, and to honor these brave men and women we’ll be teaming up with the good folks at Iron Galaxy to do a really fun charity stream.

We’re raising money for Stack-Up, a charity that supports Veteran and Active Duty military through gaming. Watch us go head-to-head against Iron Galaxy in games like Red Faction, Rocket League, Mario Kart, and, if we’re getting our butt kicked, The Jackbox Party Pack 1-3.

Here are the details:

When: Friday, November 11 from 16:00 – 24:00 (CST)

Where: Our campaign page  

We hope you’ll tune in and donate to this great cause! At ease. 

How to Write a Good Quiplash Prompt

How to Write a Good Quiplash Prompt

Hey, you know Quiplash 2 has a User Generated Content feature, right? You can now make custom Quiplash 2 episodes for your family/friends/biker gang!

We’ve had a few people reach out to us wanting to know the secrets to writing a good Quiplash prompt. Great question (unless it’s the one thing you ask the old, wise man on top of the mountain).

Fear not. My fellow Jackbox writers and I are here for you because not only are we very, very funny BUT we’re also humble… and eager to help.

So here are some things to keep in mind:

Think Ahead: If you can’t think of a good answer to your own prompt, then it’s probably not going to be a very good. Make sure your prompt lends itself to a lot of quick ideas. Your main focus is the set-up. It’s like volleyball Quidditch. Your job is to simply give the Quaffle to the Chaser. Which brings me to…

Know Your Audience: Are you and your friends into an obscure TV show? Then definitely write a prompt about it, but maybe don’t use it when playing with your aunt and uncle (they only set their DVR to record Bones). Definitely use any inside jokes you have with the particular group you’re playing with (e.g. “Why mom won’t let anybody else make the green bean casserole”) but make sure it’s a collective inside joke. If you’re alienating even 1-2 people, the game is a lot less fun.

Specificity is 78.4% of It: Be specific whenever possible. “The title of an erotic movie” is a vague/bad prompt, but “The title of an erotic movie for elephants” is next-level, Nobel Prize in Literature-quality stuff. However, don’t go overboard with your specificity. “The title of a 1940’s erotic film for elephants at the St. Louis Zoo” is way too much info to process. Find the right balance.

Variety is King: Both in regards to structure and types of jokes you’re generating. Don’t just write fill-in-the blanks–mix it up with prompts in the form of questions and statements. Also, don’t set-up people with the same type of joke each time. Puns are great, sure, but also throw in some prompts that direct people to write phrases, questions, objects, etc.

Don’t Overthink It: It’s not rocket surgery. Spend a little bit of time on how you want to frame your idea, but don’t labor over it. After all, it’s supposed to be fun!

Now go out there and write some _____ prompts!